DHS Diecast Discussion Forum
Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In

Not a very good day! Options · View
Lashlander
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 3:07:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/25/2007
Posts: 1,358
Location: Kodiak Ak.
Quinella
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 11:21:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/18/2003
Posts: 1,350
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
That's horrible. It sounds as if someone was really hurt. What's the real story? CAW
logmax7000
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 11:57:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 149
Holy crap! I hope that one guy that was yelling lived... not good Sad

CAT- best in the woods


eef7260
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 4:48:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/14/2006
Posts: 597
Location: The Netherlands
RobS
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 8:11:29 PM
Rank: Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 2/1/2017
Posts: 41
Location: SW Michigan
I fully realize it's easy to "armchair quarterback" these situations but wouldn't it make sense to release the load when this is beginning to happen? Does the operator not have the sensation of tipping? Are there warnings? Even a destroyed load has to be cheaper than this outcome.

Not an operator, only an interested bystander,

Rob
philco
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 8:59:17 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
Posts: 6
Yes absolutely you feel it. Looks like there was a gap in the steel plate and the front roller dropped slightly as he was walking backward. Just enough to tip the whole unit enough to have the floating tray drift in and the load drift out of his radius. I could be wrong just something I noticed.
maxcavator
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:21:33 AM
Rank: Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/16/2015
Posts: 99
RobS wrote:
I fully realize it's easy to "armchair quarterback" these situations but wouldn't it make sense to release the load when this is beginning to happen? Does the operator not have the sensation of tipping? Are there warnings? Even a destroyed load has to be cheaper than this outcome.

Not an operator, only an interested bystander,

Rob


Rob, I have wondered that myself for many years. Crane after crane collapse and they still go down with the load.

There must be an explosive cable cutting mechanism where the cable is cut as soon as the crane is going out of limits. It is absolutely retarded to operate those heavy machines w/o it.
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 11:04:30 AM
Rank: Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 55
Location: Germany, CE
Hi Maxcavator,

on many Pipelayers you will find a emergancy release function to drop the load suddenly if needed. I'm not a crane guy, but what's about a back fire when you cut a cable and drop the load immediatly on a crane this large?

Prost,

Max
mariot
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 11:08:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 2/22/2008
Posts: 201
Location: Columbia, MD
That was one horrible accident. It was fortunate (and perhaps a miracle) that no one was injured badly or worse in this mishap. No doubt, an investigation into why this happened will take place. Not knowing the lifting plan, positioning of the crane, radius of said load (which looks like a box girder being lifted for placement atop the pier seen to the right), possible wind conditions and the levelness and stability of the ground, it is hard to say exactly what caused this. I won't even begin to speculate what the chain of events were leading up to the collapse. I was wondering why the crane was being walked backwards, to the point that the rear of the crawlers were beyond the timber mats.

As far as being able to drop such a load to avoid an accident in this case, I believe that it might have been impossible to do once the tipping began, first because, the operator probably didn't feel the machine as first began tipping forward. It appears from the video, that the tip began rather slowly; the very first sensation of movement might not have been sensed until it was too late. And, if I am not mistaken (correct me if wrong) this crane might not have free-fall on the main hoist drums, and given the many parts of line in the block, the load could not be lowered fast enough to unload the crane before it tipped.

In any case, a tragic case, and a reminder of the dangers involved in heavy picks.
qball
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:11:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/18/2008
Posts: 629
Once that rig began to go, the operator was just along for the ride.
On a hydro, there is no "letting the load go."
And with that many parts of line, even at full throttle, max line down, the block will barely move.

thou shall not over-moderate!!!
hummer13
Posted: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 7:52:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/4/2006
Posts: 7,716
Location: arlington, Tx
Somtimes like in this case a floating tray, say you cut the load then you would have the high boom angle and the height of the tray pulling backeards on the machine. So it probably would have dropped the load and then went over backwards. What a lot of people who are not around cranes if you have a lot of parts on the block it does not move fast at all you can cable down but you probably dont have time to get the load down.

Jason

Nikl Scale Models
nikl scale models shapeways store
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

SoClean Theme Created by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.8 (NET v2.0) - 3/29/2008
Copyright © 2003-2008 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.