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WIP: 1:50 Caterpillar 933C LGP and 939C track loaders Options · View
Shay Stutsman
Posted: Monday, November 21, 2016 10:33:37 PM
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Joined: 5/28/2004
Posts: 335
Location: Aspen Colorado
Looks Awesome!!! Can't wait to see the finished product! Smile
Dex
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2016 5:18:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Got a handful more hours put in. I think I've lost my mind, I've decided to make 3 of these. 2 for my customer, and one for my collection. All 3 models are just about caught up with one another.


Cutting the outer portion of the arm supports:



After some grinding and filing. I used the score and snap method for the inner box cuts in case you were wondering.


Cutting the brass arms (each one is 2 pieces thick. I glue them together for ease of cutting, them I'll heat them apart later), the bandsaw was a great purchase.



Smoothing out all the cuts. I really need a bench 5" disk sander...




But damn if the finshed result isn't nice!




Things are starting to take shape.







So. You know that feeling you get when you break little rules, that little voice over your shoulder that says: "you really should lubricate that drill bit and put some oil on the metal your drilling" and that lazy voice goes: "Naw, it'll be fine, it'll just take a second" Yeah, listen to the first voice.......

The exploded bit:




The aftermath:



I got really lucky that was all the damage I did. I was able to repair it, but is was time I didn't need to waste had I just taken seconds to grab some oil.


Shrinking Sprockets down with my poor mans mill (vice and bench drill):






Well I'm.....exhausted..... time for a pint! Till next time folks, and thanks for watching!



320dlrr
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2016 10:32:41 PM

Rank: Member
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Joined: 7/30/2015
Posts: 37
Location: Ohio
Looks outstanding Dex! I'm really wanting to get into building with brass and I'd like to pick up a nice small (micro maybe) bandsaw, what saw would you recommend to me?

-Keegan

YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/user/caterpillar321dlcr

Instagram- https://instagram.com/320dlrr/

Dex
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 9:29:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
320dlrr wrote:
Looks outstanding Dex! I'm really wanting to get into building with brass and I'd like to pick up a nice small (micro maybe) bandsaw, what saw would you recommend to me?


Per my research: The smallest bandsaw I found was one that a company called Micromark sells. However I have a few issues with it that I feel outweigh the pros of it's size and variable speed ability. First, the internal wheels are only 6" wide which puts a lot more curve and strain on the blade, possibly leading to early breakage. My second issue is that MM is the only company that sells blade with a diameter small enough to fit it. Lastly, the lowest TPI (tooth per inch) they carry is 24 TPI (most every other bandsaw gets this option). Not really worth the $300.00 price tag. What I found to be most important for cutting brass is that the saw be capable of equipping a blade that is within the 18-32 TPI range, and most all can do that. For half the price you can get a bench-top bandsaw that will do everything the MM one can (sans the variable speed, which you can actually add with some DIY). The benchtop saw that I ended up going with is the Grizzy G0803 (I think I paid $120 new for it). At 46 lbs I can safely lift it onto my work bench (space is limited in my workshop), and they offer a 24TPI blade for it that is half the price of the MM saw. The only modification I made for it is a tighter blade guide thingy (the black one is OEM, the aluminum one is the one I made with the bandsaw Cool ) so that I can cut smaller things without the risk of it falling through.



I'm not sure how much experience you have with shop saws, but these are things to consider. Straight clean cuts in metal are not the bandsaws forte, even with the rip fence, cuts will still be rough to the touch and will require finishing with a sanding tool or file. Table saws with metal cutting blades are better suited for straight cuts. Bandsaws are messy and require regular cleaning after cutting metal (old toothbrush and a vacuum will do the trick), too much metal dust and buildup on the internal wheels (if they are the rubber lined type) will set the blade out of alignment if you don't tidy up. BUT, the versatility, speed, and ease of use really make the bandsaw a great tool for those of us with limited space and money, which I think makes it a top pick for somebody looking for the closest that they can get to a do-it-all saw. My bandsaw has taken half hour hand sawing jobs and have turned them into 5 minute sawing jobs, I don't regret getting it one bit.
Dex
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 9:37:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Question: Is anybody having trouble viewing my pictures due to their size? If need be, I can start uploading them smaller.
Basketball Man
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2016 1:30:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/30/2008
Posts: 3,361
Location: Good ol' Indiana
Looks like some nice progress.

-Ethan
Collection 8/2/2016
For more of the Diorama and my collection: On Facebook or On YouTube
320dlrr
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2016 2:45:17 PM

Rank: Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/30/2015
Posts: 37
Location: Ohio
Dex wrote:
320dlrr wrote:
Looks outstanding Dex! I'm really wanting to get into building with brass and I'd like to pick up a nice small (micro maybe) bandsaw, what saw would you recommend to me?


Per my research: The smallest bandsaw I found was one that a company called Micromark sells. However I have a few issues with it that I feel outweigh the pros of it's size and variable speed ability. First, the internal wheels are only 6" wide which puts a lot more curve and strain on the blade, possibly leading to early breakage. My second issue is that MM is the only company that sells blade with a diameter small enough to fit it. Lastly, the lowest TPI (tooth per inch) they carry is 24 TPI (most every other bandsaw gets this option). Not really worth the $300.00 price tag. What I found to be most important for cutting brass is that the saw be capable of equipping a blade that is within the 18-32 TPI range, and most all can do that. For half the price you can get a bench-top bandsaw that will do everything the MM one can (sans the variable speed, which you can actually add with some DIY). The benchtop saw that I ended up going with is the Grizzy G0803 (I think I paid $120 new for it). At 46 lbs I can safely lift it onto my work bench (space is limited in my workshop), and they offer a 24TPI blade for it that is half the price of the MM saw. The only modification I made for it is a tighter blade guide thingy (the black one is OEM, the aluminum one is the one I made with the bandsaw Cool ) so that I can cut smaller things without the risk of it falling through.



I'm not sure how much experience you have with shop saws, but these are things to consider. Straight clean cuts in metal are not the bandsaws forte, even with the rip fence, cuts will still be rough to the touch and will require finishing with a sanding tool or file. Table saws with metal cutting blades are better suited for straight cuts. Bandsaws are messy and require regular cleaning after cutting metal (old toothbrush and a vacuum will do the trick), too much metal dust and buildup on the internal wheels (if they are the rubber lined type) will set the blade out of alignment if you don't tidy up. BUT, the versatility, speed, and ease of use really make the bandsaw a great tool for those of us with limited space and money, which I think makes it a top pick for somebody looking for the closest that they can get to a do-it-all saw. My bandsaw has taken half hour hand sawing jobs and have turned them into 5 minute sawing jobs, I don't regret getting it one bit.


Interesting... I'll defiantly look into those saws. Thanks for your input

-Keegan

YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/user/caterpillar321dlcr

Instagram- https://instagram.com/320dlrr/

Ironstef70
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2016 8:02:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 6/27/2013
Posts: 804
Location: Quebec, Canada,
Great work Dex.

Word is from a brass fan too. I ma less active on this forum, but still busy.

CP 3026/1126 switchers:
"/>

CN 1501 track geometry test car "BUDD":


CN 1501 test run

Cheers!

Stephane


___________________________________________________
Playing with toys since 1970, now building them.
Dex
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2016 9:06:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Nice! Are those GP38s? Did you make those from scratch?
Dex
Posted: Sunday, January 08, 2017 3:42:34 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
I finished all of the lift arms. I've added the middle support, and the part that looks like a blade will be shaped into the appropriate appearance later. It was really tricky getting all of this lined up. For 100% handmade with no milling equipment, I'm happy with the result. Man, I'd love an X-Y table though.





Shay Stutsman
Posted: Sunday, January 08, 2017 8:30:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/28/2004
Posts: 335
Location: Aspen Colorado
Dex,

That is looking absolutely fantastic!!!

Sincerely,
-SS
Ironstef70
Posted: Monday, January 09, 2017 8:04:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/27/2013
Posts: 804
Location: Quebec, Canada,
Dex, I don't want to contaminate this post with my stuff. But please log on this forum for the making of. Wink

Diesel Detailer

BUDD

I really like your project by the way. I don't have a miling machine yet, but I must admit that it might be in the plans for the future. Now no matter the tools you have, that requires talent and you are obviously doing great. Thanks for sharing.

Stephane

___________________________________________________
Playing with toys since 1970, now building them.
max
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2017 10:43:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/10/2002
Posts: 1,725
Location: out of jail!!
Hello Dex,
That looks really good.....brass work at its best!!
Now tell me, are you really supposed to pour oïl on a hole being drilled in order to keep the drill bit to break??What diameter was the hole you were drilling when your mishap occured?
I am asking this because i never lubricate any piece of brass being drilled.Usually, i go very slowly and i rarely break drill bits.What speed goes the drill when you bore holes?
I keep my press drill to its lowest speed-something like 600-800 RPM when drilling brass. I found drilling holes smaller than .032 is more difficult and that's when the bits tend to break more.......
Also.....
Do you cut brass with a Dremel?
If so, wich one do you prefer between the band saw and the Dremel?Does a bandsaw will do things that you can't do with a Dremel?
I considered a few times getting an alternative to the "cutting Wheel" but never manage to make a choice on what else i could use.
I tried myself once with a small jigsaw but the result was a total disaster-i had the blade with the largest number of TPI that i could find but it did'nt work out well.All i manage to do was breaking the blades.
All right, that's enough questions like that!!
Keep us updated, great work.
Regards.
Max.



Cat 245.....Now and Forever

i am looking for industrial auction brochures from Ritchie Bros, Miller & Miller, Forke Bros, First Team Auction, Max Rouse, etc from the 70's, 80's and 90's.I am a collector and heavy equipment enthusiast and these pamphlets are loaded with nice pictures of cleaned and freshly painted equipment.Thet don't have much value once the sale is over but they are a great help to me in preserving the memory of machines that are no longer being built.Please, help my hobby by looking in your old storage boxes and file folders for these old auction sale brochures.Your help is much appreciated.[/i]
Dex
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2017 1:34:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Hey Max, long time no see.

My dremel self destructed a year ago when I used the, wait for it, jig saw attachment on wood. However I've used cutting wheel on a regular drill for brass, but I found them too messy. I feel the bandsaw offers more freedom with a more contained mess, and no risk of exploding wheels. It cuts through brass like butter. The TPI of the blade is crucial though. 24 is plenty sufficient, go too much lower and it'll grab, and that's dangerous. For straight cuts in .5mm brass, I just score it with a blade, lock it in the vice along the score, and snap it. Anything thicker I use the band saw. For the thicker stuff, like what I used for the booms, I couldn't imagine trying to do that with a wheel; the saw is just so effortless. So to sum it up, most all my cuts now are done on the band saw, with occasional score and snaps for the thin stuff. All my cleanup work is done with grinding and sanding bits or hand files.

My drill press is variable speed, and I only need lubricant when drilling zinc, which is where the exploding Harbor Freight bit happened (I needed metric bits in a hurry, and they were the only ones available). Zinc seems to heat and grab onto the bits. As far a drilling brass I don't use oil. I've found that it actually gums up the hole and works against you. Like you said, nice and slow and you're good.

Thanks for the compliments BTW! I'll post pics on Sunday of my latest work.
Dex
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2017 6:40:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Got some very meticulous stuff done this weekend. Knocked out 4 sets of hydraulics, and redid some of my older work the the 933 hydros as I wasn't satisfied with the original results.












Next is the vertical link that will connect the next set of hydraulics I do the the upper arms and bucket that I've yet to make.

No blue prints, all I have to work with is pictures, and eyeball it:





Glued together 2 stacks of 6 so I can shape them all at the same time and keep things even.






That's all for now!
Neil87
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2017 9:24:44 PM

Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/16/2016
Posts: 6
Location: Mississauga
Great work, are you using a torch or a gun for soldering?

If Mother Nature wanted fiberglass boats, she would have planted fiberglass trees.
Dex
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2017 10:15:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Neil87 wrote:
Great work, are you using a torch or a gun for soldering?


Thanks. I use a torch. I hated it at first, but now that i'm more familiar with it I prefer it. On rare occasions I'll use the gun, but the torch is quicker, and ensures that I won't accidentally move what I'm working on.
RowanH
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2017 3:26:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 6/30/2003
Posts: 4,910
Location: Melbourne, Australia
I've loved following this thread, keep up the great work! Looking forward to the next update.

Rowan.

1:25th scale CAT 375L excavator

Basketball Man
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2017 7:05:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/30/2008
Posts: 3,361
Location: Good ol' Indiana
Good luck with the cylinders and linkages. That is one part that I really hate about scratch building, lots of small parts and geometry to get right.

-Ethan
Collection 8/2/2016
For more of the Diorama and my collection: On Facebook or On YouTube
Dex
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 9:01:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/12/2012
Posts: 266
Location: San Diego, California
Finished all the the vertical connectors. (Anybody know what these are actually called?)




I wanted to do the upper arms next, but I need a compound table so that I can make more precise measurements in between holes. So while that's enroute from the Ebays, I decided to get started on the buckets.



Round bends are done by hand (guess what other tool I'd like some day?)





This mini break is pretty nifty, though I had to do a lot of modding to take the slop and play out of it.



Basically had to eyeball the design off of photos and make my own blue prints



Out side frame of bucket with a TEASER! (I'm still a long way from being done with these.)



Inside of buckets and outside soldered together.




I'll get the sides done this week. I finally have some free time again Teeth

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