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DieCast Masters Lowboy Options · View
Claus
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 6:23:18 AM

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codydanos
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 11:23:02 AM
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Quinella wrote:
Okay Ken, what are the WSI Rogers four axle flips designed as, 60 ton hauling capacity? Would one of these carry a Dresser 560 Payloader with bucket and wheels intact? An International 6x4 would be all that is necessary to pull the lowbed with that load? CAW



Yes I was wondering the same thing. What can you realistically haul with a setup like that?
GuyM
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 11:47:28 AM
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Location: Le Muy - Var - France
A few XL Specialized lowboys similar to the Diecast Masters model, found on the constructor website with, from top to bottom, a XL 110 (1), XL 120s (2 and 3), a XL 130 (4) and a XL 140 (5):











Regards.
Guy

Exkvate3140
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 12:37:29 PM
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Craig when Claus and I talk trash about you the subject came up and Claus can tell you whatever you need to know about them. As far as a model I believe one was made or being produced and I believe it was a Kress. Claus I’m sure would have more information on that than I.
Steve
kcmtoys
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 3:36:28 PM

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codydanos wrote:
Quinella wrote:
Okay Ken, what are the WSI Rogers four axle flips designed as, 60 ton hauling capacity? Would one of these carry a Dresser 560 Payloader with bucket and wheels intact? An International 6x4 would be all that is necessary to pull the lowbed with that load? CAW



Yes I was wondering the same thing. What can you realistically haul with a setup like that?


Ok, here we go, We had lengthy discussions about this when the trailer first came out. The trailer is a 55 ton trailer. The catch here is, you can only carry the amount of weight supported by the number of axles you have on the ground, and the bridge law which varies in a lot of states. Most states will allow you 20,000 an axle. A handful of states will not give you 80,000 on 4 unless you have a stinger (booster) and want the weight spread with a jeep and booster. The West Coast has a completely different set of rules.

A 4 axle tractor and 4 axle trailer= 20-20-20-20 20-20-20-20 = 160.000 lbs. The weight of a heavy duty tractor and trailer is approx. 50,000 lbs. Payload would be 110.000, right on the money for a 55 ton trailer. Mind you, it is going to be closer to 100,000 because it is hard to axle out perfectly and also get 20,000 on the steer axle.

Here is the new IH with a jeep and 1 axle stinger:
15-20-20 20-20 20-20-20 20 = 175,000 Empty weight is approx 75,000 = Payload 100,000 A two axle stinger in this case doesn't help you unless you have more weight to the rear like a scraper that is over the 3 trailer axles.

Lake Michigan States you can have 25,000-26000 an axle, 187,000 on 8 axles 220,000 on 4 + 2 + 4

CAW yes, you can put a 560 on a 4 axle tractor and 4 axle trailer in some states as it weighs 95,000 +-, but needs to be on a beam for height.

Hope this helps.Whistle d'oh! Shhh Ken






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Quinella
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 1:01:23 AM

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If you don't have a rail trailer, you can off the wheels and carry them on a flatbed. More complicated. I said though a 6x4 tractor. Claus' pictures show a 6x4 with a four axle lowboy carrying a loader, so it can be done. That old picture of the Keen Pete COE with the CAT 988 is cool. CAW
kcmtoys
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 2:07:52 PM

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CAW Here is a brief rundown for North Carolina:

ROUTINE PERMIT LIMITS

Length:

105′
Beams and girders maximum 120′
Width: 15′

Height: No set limits – determined by route. Loads over 14′ may take extra processing time.

Weight:

Gross Weights
5 axles – 112,000
6 axles – 120,000
7 axles – 132,000


Axle Weights
Steer Axle – 20,000*
Single – 25,000
Tandem – 50,000
Tridem – 60,000
Quad – 68,000
Weight over 132,000 or widths over 15′ are superloads.
Letter from shipper must be included with a superload application.

ESCORTS

Length:

Over 110′ – 1 escort
Over 150′ – 2 escorts
Overhang: Over 15′ front or rear – 1 escort

Width:

Over 12′ – 1 escort
Over 14′ – 2 escorts on 2 lane or 2 way roads
Over 15′ wide may require police escorts
Height:

Over 14’5″ – 1 escort with high pole
Note: For I-40 tunnels near TN line:

Eastbound and over 13’11” – 1 escort with height pole
Westbound and over 14’2″ – 1 escort with height pole
Weight: Over 149,999 pounds – 1 escort.

MISCELLANEOUS: Blades and buckets which cannot be angled to not exceed 14 feet in width must be removed. A blade or bucket, if it is part of the original equipment being hauled, may be detached and hauled with the equipment without being considered a divisible load. Beams, poles, pipes, structural material don’t need permit up to 85 feet long, daylight only, on Interstates and designated roads.
Multiple pieces rule: NC does not allow or permit for multiple pieces on an overlength vehicle/load (over 60’ overall length) on “non-designated” highways. If you are hauling two farm tractors end-to-end and your overall length is 70 feet, we cannot get a NC permit except for Interstate and “designated” US routes (mainly 4-lane US highways). If your route is on other highways (including most US Highways), NC will not give us a permit unless we claim that it is for a single piece.

SIGNS, FLAGS & LIGHTS: “Oversize Load” signs are required at front and rear for all loads exceeding 10 feet wide. Flags are required on each corner and at the widest point of the load for all loads over 8’6″ wide, but the flags “…shall be so mounted as to not increase the overall width of the load.” Rear overhang in excess of 4 feet requires a flag, or at night a red or amber light visible for at least 200 feet.



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Exkvate3140
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 2:53:19 PM
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Ken what about a brief rundown inside a townhouse in the Carolina’s, and would shag or hardwoods have to be considered.
Steve
Barkerjoh
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 3:51:53 PM

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OVERHEAD coffee table restrictions are not shown. Escorts this is a diecast forum Ken. Besides with Christmas who can afford more than 1
Quinella
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 4:34:42 PM

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Who the heck lives in South Carolina? Ken: You must start all over. I'm thinking we may have to reduce your hourly rate on The Forum. But you're better than that weasel in RI. CAW
Exkvate3140
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 7:10:02 PM
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Quinella, Ken is not only a genius with truck weight laws he is also a gentlemen and because he is, this is his way of telling you to stop asking him all these questions.

New Rule: Quinella is only allowed one question to ask Ken per week and anything over one question you (Quinella) have to send Ken one of those many cab overs you drive around your townhouse in NC.
Steve
kcmtoys
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 8:23:36 PM

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Quinella wrote:
Who the heck lives in South Carolina? Ken: You must start all over. I'm thinking we may have to reduce your hourly rate on The Forum. But you're better than that weasel in RI. CAW


I changed it.


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kcmtoys
Posted: Wednesday, December 26, 2018 5:20:10 PM

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Bridge law (the distance between axles) has a lot to do with weight permits. I will try and explain "bridge law". Federal bridge law is the distance from the center of the steer axle on the tractor to the center of the rear trailer axle. That distance has to be 51' to obtain 80,000 gross weight. This is for the Federal Interstate System, but the States all conform to this in one way or another.

Fed bridge law by Ken Wheeler, on Flickr"/>


Permit Bridge is complicated and quite different from state to state. Most State permits you put in your spacing's and it will tell you what you can haul. A 26' or longer deck will get you maximum weight. You need a 14'6" spread between the center of the rear tractor axle and the center of the first jeep axle and 14'6" from the center of the rear trailer axle to the center of the first stinger (booster) axle to get the maximum weight. There are States like Iowa and Michigan that are axle states, minimum spread and 20,000 an axle, no matter how may axles you have. You will see 5 axle ( 1 steer and 4 weight bearing axles ) tractors in Iowa and trailers in Michigan with 8 or more axles which can haul way over 100,000 without a permit. This all means "squat" in the model world, but it is good to see guys try to get it close to where they live.










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codydanos
Posted: Wednesday, December 26, 2018 11:12:01 PM
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Thanks ken. I guess that explains the Michigan specials (Michigan doubles). Always thought those were pretty neat.
Weserhutte
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 12:42:55 PM
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kcmtoys wrote:
You will see a lot of 5 axle ( 1 steer and 4 drive ) tractors in Iowa


If you would have any photos of these tractors, please post some? I've gone through the Iowa dealers listed in Truck Paper and haven't found anything like what you described.
Claus
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 12:59:28 PM

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Weserhutte
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 1:12:31 PM
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That's only two drive axles and two cheaters!
kcmtoys
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 4:11:51 PM

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For the purpose of this post, and for everyone to understand, I made reference to a 4 drive (quad drive) instead of 4 weight bearing axles. such as a tri drive and drop axle, a tandem and two drop axles, or a tandem with a drop axle and a rear pin on axle. There is no quad drive that i am aware of. Thanks Claus for the picture. Sorry for any confusion. Ken







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Claus
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 4:41:16 PM

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Ken I knew what you meant. A quad drive would steal a lot of Horse Power!
Weserhutte
Posted: Friday, December 28, 2018 8:17:02 PM
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kcmtoys wrote:
There is no quad drive that i am aware of.

Ken


I was hoping you'd come through with photos of something I'd never seen. Are there many tridems in your area?
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