DHS Diecast Discussion Forum
Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In

The Mammoet Exchanger Project Options · View
Alberta Millwright
Posted: Thursday, July 30, 2020 10:46:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/27/2014
Posts: 181
Location: Canada, Alberta
Well it was time for a new model and I really wanted something special and rather than doing another crane I decided to check out this Mammoet Exchanger model. I really like how it was an actual move and has a story behind it however when I looked at the IMC site the explanation of what this was is off. I think a lot of people see this model but don't really understand what it is or what these parts do in a steel mill. I will try my best to do an explanation and if there are any steel mill workers here please feel free to correct any of my mistakes.

First, this is a really well done model that is very impressive and I love how it breaks up the collection. I really suggest this for anyone looking for a model that has a neat story behind it.

The first mistake is the way that IMC announces that this is the "top of a blast furnance", which is not true. What you see here is the Trunion Ring (dark grey), the Bottom of the Converter (light grey) and the Tilt Drive System (green blue). This Converter is being hauled upside down without the top on. It was built by SMS Siemag who is based out of Germany and build some of the most impressive pieces of machinery on the planet. The Converter itself is an actual BOF (Basic Oxygen Furnance) and produces mostly "Steel", where a blast furnance will produce the "Pig Iron" or molten iron that gets poured into the Converter by an overhead crane and ladel. The top of the Converter is not included in this model but it does have a big hole in the top so molten iron and scrap steel can be poured in as well as allowing a massive Oxygen Lance to come down and introduce pure oxygen to get the reaction going. The tilting has a few purposes like pouring out slag, pouring out steel and product introduction.













When this Converter gets moved into position they will move the (4) arms on the Tilt Drive (green blue) outwards and attach (4) motors to the ends of them. These arms are 4 stage gear reducers that all turn a massive Bull Gear in the big part of the Tilt Drive (Essentially the green blue part is just a massive gear box that tilts the massive Trunnion Ring which is attached to the Converter). They will tilt the trunion 180 degrees, install the refractory elements on the inside and then add the top of the Converter that has a big hole in it. On the other side of the Trunnion Ring is a massive pillow block bearing (light blue) that gets fastened to the surrounding structure. When this converter is full of steel it will weigh in excess of 1000 tons so the power train itself is a marvel of engineering especially when you see how quick and precise this Converter can tilt! I do not know the Hp or rpm of these motors for this application.

Here is a picture of another Tilt Drive in the assembly shop at SMS Siemag.




The 7 or 8 shield looking things (light grey) are what is called the Lamella suspension system. These connect the Converter to the Trunion Ring and allow for thermal expansion when the Converter is in use. Here are some pics of the suspension.



Here is the sequence of the Converter.




And finally here is some pictures of the Converter in action in the steel mill.





And now you know a little bit more about what this model is and the neat process behind it. There are numerous videos online of a BOF (Basic Oxygen Furnance) on Youtube that show everything going on. I also suggest looking up SMS Siemag to see how impressive that company really is. They usually do these installs themselves but TATA steel in Holland got Mammoet to take care of this one and I am thinking it was because of the massive weight when installing 85% of all the components in one shot.





If it's mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and automated I can build it.
Paul R
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 5:40:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/11/2007
Posts: 8,597
Location: Lincolnshire
Well done! It is a neat model even though I also do not have it, but you are right in that it is great that is has a story behind it.

Cheers,

Paul R
modelmaniac
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 11:59:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/4/2005
Posts: 766
Location: england
Excellent description.The steel making process is,for me,very impressive.Just the one task of making dump beds in one piece now,like its nothing special,is incredible.There are,of course millions of applications.Those big things are usually made by something bigger.I find the whole process fascinating.
Campmb
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:22:17 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/22/2013
Posts: 184
Thanks for a great post. Not only a great model,but the rest of your display, and the explanation of the process as well. Mike
JohnGalt
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 2:09:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/27/2007
Posts: 1,440
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Thank you for the great description, explanation, and photos. It's a great looking model, but I appreciate it even more for understanding the significance of it. Well done!
kerst
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 6:02:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/7/2005
Posts: 1,095
Location: Copake, NY
Interesting project! Thanks for explaining the details. The torque needed must be staggering.

Kerst


http://forums.dhsdiecast.com/default.aspx?g=posts&m=1096251
Alberta Millwright
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 9:11:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/27/2014
Posts: 181
Location: Canada, Alberta
Thanks guys, I really wanted to give people an idea of what it is they are looking at, for most it probably just looks like a "spaceship thingy" (my wife's terms). IMC did a fantastic job on the model but really lacked any information about what it really was that Mammoet was moving. I really wish they would have had a nice book with details on the whole move kind of like that AC 700 book, it really would have finished off this whole package.

If it's mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and automated I can build it.
kokosing Const Co
Posted: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:05:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/1/2006
Posts: 2,426
Location: Buffalo, NY
Nice job! Love your shelf display too!

You guys are making me want to buy another crane or two...
wildpig1234
Posted: Saturday, August 01, 2020 3:36:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/26/2019
Posts: 137
Alberta Millwright wrote:
Well it was time for a new model and I really wanted something special and rather than doing another crane


What's wrong with another crane...lol... you can't have enough crane... Smiley

Seriously though i always told myself my next one will be a spmt or an MB astro but then i keep ending up getting another crane....lol
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

SoClean Theme Created by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.8 (NET v2.0) - 3/29/2008
Copyright © 2003-2008 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.